Category Archives: Gender

Advocate: Women Watch 2014

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Maggie Stark is the Founding President of the Sr. Dorothy Kazel Club for Systemic Change

Today a little over 25 students, faculty, staff and Ursuline Sisters gathered to recognize the 51 women and children murdered in Cuyahoga County since last year’s event.

As we walked the half-mile loop of red silhouettes, I noticed that the figure I was holding had the name of a 22 year old girl. Being only one year older than her, I couldn’t possibly imagine leaving this world so soon, so tragically.

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Gina Messina-Dysert: continuing to claim a feminist identity

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Originally published August 21, 2013 by Feminism and Religion.

Recently Susan Sarandon was asked if she is a feminist and her response left many asking if perhaps we are moving towards a post-feminist world. Of course, the very fact that Sarandon was asked if she is a feminist well demonstrates that gender politics continue (certainly, men are not asked such questions).

According to Sarandon, “I think of myself as a humanist because I think it’s less alienating to people who think of feminism as being a load of strident bitches.”  She went on to explain that “feminist” is an “old-fashioned word” and is actually used to minimize women and girls.

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Fridays with B&B: the “F” word

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A weekly conversation between your campus Marketing gals Brittney & Becca. TGIF! 

Becca: Where do we start?
Britt: Hold on one sec – I’m posting a photo (Instagram).
*Becca sips her chai tea latte… (we are writing from a local coffee shop).
Britt: Ok, so – feminism. First, let’s follow up on last week’s convo. Have you read about the backlash #banbossy is getting?
Becca: I did – I saw the one article about a Dad who said he will continue to call his daughter bossy when she acts bossy – and the same goes for his son.
Britt: I haven’t read that piece. I’m interested in the conversations about #banbossy not being important because there are so many other pressing women’s issues (education, violence against women, etc.). Which is true, but it’s also not good if we are not talking about how young girls and women are perceived in terms of language, double standards.

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Celebrate Women’s History Month with International Women’s Panel March 31

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The College is hosting a panel discussion titled “Transnational Perspectives on Women’s Rights as Human Rights” at 6 PM March 31 in the Mullen Little Theater, 2550 Lander Road, Pepper Pike, Ohio 44124. The discussion is free and open to the public and will be followed by a dessert reception.

“The theme for Women’s History Month 2014 is Women of Courage, Character and Commitment. Ursuline College, through its women-focused identity and mission, seeks to educate and encourage such women and prepare them to participate bravely and passionately in a global society,” Mary Frances Pipino, Ph.D., Director of Ursuline College’s Ursuline Studies Program, said.

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Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies serves as panelist at United Nations’ 58th Commission on the Status of Women

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Originally posted on businesswire.com

In their continuing efforts to promote awareness of issues facing mothers worldwide, American Mothers, Inc.® will host two panels at the upcoming session of the United Nations’ 58th Commission on the Status of Women. “The Feminization of Poverty” and “Women and HIV” will take place at United Nations Headquarters in New York on March 11, 2014.

American Mothers, a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization seeking to honor mothers and represent mothers’ issues, holds consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations.

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Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

FebAware2013It’s Valentine’s Day and February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, so it seems like a good time to begin a conversation about healthy relationships. Although many of us think this is an issue that will not impact our own lives, statistics demonstrate that 75% of individuals know someone who has experienced domestic violence.

Domestic violence is a global epidemic that threatens the health and well being of women and girls regardless of race, culture, religion, social status, or other qualifying factors.  Statistics remain stagnant with 1 in 3 women worldwide experiencing violence in their lifetime.  In the Unites States, a woman is beaten every nine seconds.  Domestic violence continues to be the leading cause of injury and death to women.  In fact, four out of ten women murdered die at the hands of intimate partners.  Disturbingly, these numbers represent a very small portion of this epidemic given that upwards of 95% of incidences go unreported.

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Fat Talk

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By Avery Friedman, CNN Legal Analyst and Ursuline College Distinguished Visiting Professor in Constitutional Law

In 1920 women were given the right to vote.

In 1963 women were entitled by law to be paid in the same way men are paid.

In 1981, Sandra Day O’Connor became the first female justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

In 2007 Nancy Pelosi became the first female Speaker of the House.

Job and professional opportunities have never been greater. So why is it that – - after all this – - – 54% of women would rather be hit by a truck than be fat? (You read that right.)

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Guest Blog: DVCAC’s Teen Advocate Megan Gergen discusses dating violence

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February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month! I am excited to introduce myself, Megan Gergen, as the new Teen & Young Adult Advocate at the Domestic Violence & Child Advocacy Center, located in Cleveland. I previously worked with DVCAC at the agency’s emergency shelter as a youth and women’s advocate. After a brief time away, I am happy to be back working at the agency!



In my role, I work with young people, ages 13-24, who have, or who are currently experiencing, dating violence. I assist with risk assessments and safety planning, provide advocacy at police stations and through the court and protection order process as well as provide support and/or connect individuals with counseling referrals or services.

So, what is exactly is dating violence? Dating violence is a patter of behaviors that an abuser uses to gain power and control over a victim. This can be through different forms of abuse including physical (hitting, pushing, slapping, etc), emotional (insults and threats, among others), sexual (touching, coercing, any action that you don’t feel comfortable with), verbal (name calling, yelling, swearing…), and financial abuse (controlling your money, social media, stalking your communications). As many as one in five college females will experience some form of dating violence! And young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence – almost triple the national average. What’s even more staggering is that only 33 per cent of teens and young people ever tell someone about the abuse.

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Are men really needed at all?

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By Avery Friedman, CNN Legal Analyst and Ursuline College Distinguished Visiting Professor in Constitutional Law

For a guy who has spent time at nearly three dozen universities, I can tell you there’s no place like Ursuline. Maybe it’s the nurturing quality of seemingly everybody here. Maybe it’s Sister Diana who personifies the school. Maybe it’s something in the water. I don’t know. More people hug around Ursuline than at any university or college I’ve ever been to or lectured at.

Maureen Dowd, whose writing I adore, recently spent time with Professor David Page who’s an evolutionary biologist at M.I.T. Page teaches a class called “Are Males Really Necessary?”

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MiasBlog

How the Media Failed Women in 2013

MiasBlogAs we look back on 2013 there have certainly been some positive strides towards representation of women in the media.  Malala was pictured on the front page of Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.  Films with female leads struck box office gold.  More and more television shows with strong female characters are earning high ratings and the first African American woman was nominated for an Emmy since 1995.   And the Goldiblox ad has gone viral highlighting the inventive minds of girls:

This said, while some things have changed, many things have stayed the same.  The media is one of the most powerful tools we have access to.  It has the ability to educate and effect social change, yet we use it as a means to oppress and demean.

For instance, consider the following statistics:

  • By a nearly 3 to 1 margin, male front-page bylines at top newspapers outnumbered female bylines in coverage of the 2012 presidential election. Men were also far more likely to be quoted than women in newspapers, television and public radio.
  • On Sunday TV talk shows, women comprised only 14 percent of those interviewed and 29 percent of roundtable guests.
  • Talk radio and sports talk radio hosts are overwhelmingly male.
  • As newspaper employment continues to tumble, so does the number of women in key jobs.
  • Newer, online-only news sites have fallen into the same rut as legacy media. Male bylines outnumbered female bylines at four of six sites reviewed.
  • The percentage of women who are television news directors edged up, reaching 30 percent for the first time. Overall employment of women in TV news remains flat.
  • Obituaries about men far outnumber those of women in top national and regional newspapers.
  • Women comprised just 9 percent of the directors of the top 250 domestic grossing films of 2012.
  • Women comprised 39 percent of documentary directors whose work appeared at major festivals in 2011-12.
  • Across all behind-the-camera positions, females were most likely to be producers. However, as the prestige of the producing post increased, the percentage of female participation decreased.

Women continue to be grossly misrepresented within one of the most powerful social tools in existence.  The result?  Continued oppression and support for violence against women.

So what can you do?

Consider how you participate in the problem and how you can participate in the solution.   We all engage the system and have the ability to make an impact.  While it may seem like an impossible task, small acts by many have the power to effect change.  Take The Representation Project Pledge to use your voice to challenge society’s poor representation of women.  You can also use the hashtag #NotBuyingIt on Twitter to demonstrate your commitment to challenging the misrepresentation of women and girls in the media.  These are just a few ways you can be part of the solution.  For more information, see The Representation Project.

Gina Messina-Dysert, Ph.D. is Dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Ursuline College.